Timorris Lane

Timorris Lane has been working hard in the studio and on the stage since he moved to New York from Los Angeles two years ago. He spends his weekends getting paid to sing at events all over the city and his weekdays writing new material to record at the studio. He is currently finishing up a new project with the release date not yet announced.

Up to now Lane has lived the kind of life often heard about in movies or in biographies of singers who made it big. He grew up in Cleveland, Ohio playing piano and singing from a young age in the Cleveland Boys’ Choir. While studying abroad in Tokyo he realized he wanted to be an artist after he wrote his first song titled “One Day” which ended up on his first ep in 2011 titled the “Timorris EP.” He finished college and moved to Atlanta, eventually quitting his day job to focus on singing. Ten years later, Lane is working full time as a singer.

The kind of decisions that Lane makes is filled with taking risks and trusting his instincts. After a decade spent weaving through obstacles, Lane approaches his art with a seasoned perspective on where he has started. He also has an outlook that involves an undeterred motivation and belief in himself. He has certainly come a long way since his childhood days of singing in the Cleveland Boys’ Choir. Lane’s journey offers inspiring words that anyone can live by.

JM: Since you started pursuing music, you’ve moved around quite a lot. What inspired these moves to different cities?

TL: At first I was following my instincts. When I was in Atlanta I felt like a big fish in a small pond. I moved to L.A where the vibe was different. I was hesitant to move to New York, I thought I was too green, but L.A prepared me.

JM: How did you grow as an artist from L.A to New York?

TL: I got a lot of rejection in L.A and I developed a tougher skin. My mentor used to say it’s going to be at least ten years, at the time I didn’t want to hear it, but you learn a lot. It’s from those mess ups that you become who you are. I feel like I’m just breaking in.

JM: How did you make the decision to be an artist full time?

TL: When I graduated, I worked a 9-5 job in addition to singing when I was in Atlanta. Everyone told me to keep my job but when I did that it made music a hobby and it didn’t feel like a hobby to me. I kept hearing “leap of faith.” There were times I couldn’t even afford a sandwich and then I would go to packed shows.

JM: Did it ever feel like a mistake?

TL: There were times I regretted it so much. No one ever wants to struggle, but that’s the coal that makes the diamond. I hate it but I love it. That’s what the city did for me. To be a struggling artist was literally a struggle. I still did temporary jobs on the side but then I started doing weddings and making money singing. I funded my ep with singing for money.

JM: The music from your last ep, “Big City Life,” was more of an upbeat project. What can we expect from what you are working on now?

TL: It’s still going to be up-tempo but I give more of the ballads. That’s how I started because I played the piano. In Atlanta people told me I needed more up-tempo, but I’m doing more of a balance because we’re all balanced. Sometimes you want to turn up, sometimes you want to cry.

JM: I think hard work and patience is a key factor in anything, but especially the music industry. What inspires you to keep going?

TL: I just don’t see myself doing anything else and I don’t doubt myself. If you feel like you have no other options you stick with it.

To learn more about Timorris Lane, go to http://www.everythingtimorris.com

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